5.24.2009

Podcast #12 - Sebo. Michael Black and Danny Dunham

7 comments:

MetaGrrrl said...

Nice session, guys! And now I'm all hungry for amazing fish.

Who had the fabulous quote about not getting bent out of shape over Twitter? ("If you can't stand the...")

matt chou said...

Wow, you guys really outdid yourselves. This is probably my favorite podcast so far. Great humor, awesome information!

Having been brought up in Japan, I've pretty much given up on having authentic sushi in the states. I'm really excited about trying Sebo next chance I get.

Also, Speez rulez! we need more of her on the show.

don't touch my knife said...

that was in my opinion the best Podcast yet. you guys destroyed that shit. Its really good to just hear cooks being cooks. I think everyone whos ever worked in a professional kitchen can name the chef or lifer or just more experienced linecook who molded them on some deeper level into what they are now. I know i can.
Like i think Michael was talking about how its good to find someone who loves the same thing you do onthe same level. be it fish, food in general, or just the life that we live.
hope to see more like this in the future. it was brilliant, even the tail end with just everyone going, "ohhhh shit, ooooh AHHH" over hot-dogs and the technique being ruhlmans chiccarones.

samhill said...

Just got round to listening to this the other day. It was a shame to hear about the use of bluefin at sebo. I noticed that this statement was accompanied by an embarassed snigger by the chef in question. Also the import of the japanese specialties seems to go against Nopa's local sourcing ideals. It seems strange to me that chefs from Nopa would be promoting a restaurant that openly sells endangered species and imports fish thousands of miles.

Richie said...

@samhill: Are you familiar with the Kindai Bluefin that they speak about?

samhill said...

I had heard of this way of farming tuna but didn't know the name and hadn't make the link to the fish that sebo serve, so apologies for that. However this method of farming tuna still isn't a very efficient way of producing food - the tuna needing to eat many times their own weight in smaller fish before mature. If only the Japanese could be persuaded to replace their tuna addiction with mackerel.

I still think my point about locality is valid. Unless I really do have this wrong and these Tuna are farmed just in San Francisco bay...

Richie said...

@samhill: I understand and appreciate your point, but I'm not the locavore police, nor do I want to force my ideaology on anyone. What Sebo does is inspiring; they still use seasonal ingredients, and are deeply respected by the chef community in SF. And those boys can rock mackerel and sardines like no ones business.